Budaörs Antik

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XVIII. és XIX. századi műtárgyak kollekciója

Cleaning and reviving

Cleaning and reviving

Before cleaning remove all dust from the surface of the piece, using a soft-bristled dusting brush. Make sure you work the bristles into any recessed sections and mouldings. If your piece is simply dull and dirty without being covered in sticky dirt and grime (or if you have removed this grime using the method described here) the slightly cloudy surface will need to be cleaned. Use a 500ml container to mix 250ml of cleaning and reviving solution: 4 parts white spirit to 1 part boiled linseed oil. This will remove any dirt and cloudiness and revive colour and Patina. Make a pad of coarse, lint-free cotton rag, dampen it with the solution, and work the rag vigorously, in a circular motion, over the piece. The dirt will begin to dissolve and collect on the rag. Turn and recharge the rag when it gets dirty, and replace it when necessary. Finish by wiping the surface with a new cotton pad dampened with white spirit. "Miller’s Care & Repair of Antiques & Collectables"

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Humidity

Humidity

We have mentioned this subject before on some of our articles; however as Autumn is now very much upon us - and therefore so is central heating – and knowing the terrible damage which can occur through neglect of this issue, it seems right to revisit it, and impress again on all you owners of antique furniture, the importance of humidity. Antique wood has higher moisture content than modern furniture wood, because the techniques used to dry the wood out prior to manufacture are far more effective now than they used to be. This means antique wood is very susceptible to reductions in humidity levels. Period properties generally have quite high internal humidity levels because they have much poorer insulation than modern houses and therefore more moist external air circulates inside. Because modern insulation is more effective, the drying effect of central heating is also more pronounced in modern houses. This means that when the furniture is moved, the humidity level of the surrounding air changes from around 60% to 40%; drying out the wood and causing the damage. The very best thing you can do to prevent this from happening to your antique furniture is to buy a humidity meter. This means you can monitor the humidity in a room and take action if necessary. A level of between 50% - 60% humidity is ideal. If you need to increase the level in a room, you can use a humidifier; or alternatively, small bowls of water placed on or near radiators will do the trick. Just make sure you keep them topped up.

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Central Heating

Central Heating

When the weather is cold, we all naturally turn up our central heating. We humans may enjoy living in a toasty warm house, but unfortunately your antique furniture probably finds this time of year a bit of a challenge. Changes in temperature – and the drying effect of central heating – both cause problems for furniture and hasten their general deterioration. Structural weakness in joints occurs because wood glue breaks down faster in dry, warm conditions, and surface cracks become more likely because of changes in humidity. Putting wooden furniture directly next to a heat source will often cause veneers to lift off, and even lead to wood warping and buckling. So at this time of year do spare a thought for your furniture and follow the recommendations below. Don't put antiques directly up against radiators (or if this is unavoidable, keep the temperature of that radiator as low as possible) Rotate furniture around the room every few weeks. Try to maintain as constant a temperature as possible, and avoid fast changes from hot to cold, or vice versa. "Virtu"

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